How do I find my trees?

April 08, 2013 | Comments: 0 | Categories:

The countryside is full of trees, so are the cities for that matter.  So how do I decide which ones to draw?  It's a question I'm often asked when talking to people about my work, so here's an insight into my decision making.

I think there are a number factors which have influenced my selection process:

  • I love looking at maps - OS maps, historical maps, schematic maps, any kind.  I've always enjoyed this as an activity not just a means to an end.  I love the challenge of interpreting this 2 dimensional information to create an understanding of the 3 dimensional landscape.  My Geography A level hasn't gone to waste!
  • Google earth and other online aerial imaging has made it possible to do extensive research of potential sites without using any petrol or getting cold and wet.
  • The joy of discovery is important to my emotional connection with the tree - if it's taken some effort to find it, access it and draw it, it's somehow more intense as an image.  If it's signposted from the road, with a path beside it and toilets nearby it's just no fun.  It's probably no coincidence that I love hunting for edible fungi and am very loathe to give up until I've found some on every trip.
  • I'm really happy being outside, in the woods, in the wind, on my own
  • When studying at art college, life drawing was the most challenging and rewarding task for me and I seem to be fascinated by trees that echo human forms.
  • Youth, perfection and prettiness doesn't appeal - I find character, age and damage much more interesting.  I think it tells us far more about ourselves.

I'm currently in a 'research and exploration' phase in my artwork so have up to date examples of this part of the process which I'll put in a second post, but it usually follows a similar path:

  • I'll begin my poring over the maps, zooming around on Google earth and searching for areas of deciduous woodland, parkland or hedgerow. 
  • The Ancient Tree Hunt's interactive map is an invaluable resource which brings together many layers of information in one easily browseable form.  What a fantastic example of passionate volunteers making a real difference.
  • The National Library of Scotland's georeferenced maps are another way to check back through time to see how the land use has changed and identify potentially old trees.
  • Gathering local knowledge is very important and I've met some lovely people this way - I always have maps around at my exhibitions and open studios events and ask people if they have any recommendations for me.  So many people love trees and are happy to share their knowledge.
  • Then comes the driving and walking bit - ideally I get to sit in the passenger seat and scout for sites, occasionally yelling "oooh stop!" then jumping out with my camera while my husband waits patiently.  Walking is much more relaxing and reaches the parts that other transport can't.
  • Once a good site has been identified, I'll plan a proper field trip and spend a good deal of time exploring the area and getting to know its trees.  Then the real work begins...

 crichton shadow



No Comments

Closed for comments.


Subscribe to comments RSS Feed